People Using Laptop Computers and Smartphone

A Guide to A/B Testing Email Marketing Campaigns

Email ab testing is a technique used to measure the performance of two or more variations of a web page or email to conclude which one is more effective. A/B testing emails is among the best practices of a data-driven and results-oriented marketing strategy. Because with the right email campaign metrics, any objective can be achieved as long there is data to be tracked, measured, and optimized.

The goal of A/B testing is to improve conversion rates, whether that means more people clicking on a link, signing up for a newsletter, or making a purchase.

There are many different types of email marketing campaigns that businesses use to promote their products or services. These include welcome emails, promotional emails, cart abandonment emails, and purchase confirmation emails. A/B testing can be used on any type of email, but it is most often used on transactional and triggered emails, as these have the highest conversion rates.

When A/B testing an email campaign, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, you need to decide what metric you want to improve. This could be click-through rate, open rate, or conversion rate. Once you have decided on a metric, you need to create two versions of your email — one that is the control, and one that is the variation. The control should be your current email, while the variation, which is essentially the variables for email ab testing, should be a slightly different version.

Once you have created your two versions, you need to send them out to a portion of your list. It’s important not to send both emails to everyone on your list, as this will impact your results. Once you have collected enough data, you can then determine which email performed better and make changes accordingly.

A/B testing an email marketing campaign is an essential tool for any business. By testing multiple variations of your emails, you can improve conversion rates and make sure that your campaigns are as effective as possible.

The Different Types of Marketing Emails

But before you get to A/B testing, you’ll need to know which email marketing strategy works and what doesn’t. There are various types of marketing emails suitable that serve specific purposes.

If, for example, a business’ primary objective for their email marketing campaign is to generate more product and brand awareness, a website traffic campaign should build up towards or make use of a product update email. This allows your target audience to focus on what your business has to offer.

That being said, here is a quick overview of the different types of marketing emails for testing various campaign objectives.

INFORMATIONAL EMAILS

  • New Promo Alert Email

This type of email informs your subscribers about a new promotion or sale that is happening on your site. It usually includes a brief description of the offer and a link to your website.

The goal of this email is to enable recipients to perform a desired action, whether that means clicking through to the website or making a purchase.

This is best used by businesses that are looking to increase website traffic or sales. An example of this would be an email from an online retailer announcing a flash sale.

  • Product Update Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers when there’s a new product or service available, or when there is a new update or release for a product they have purchased. It includes information about the update and a link to the product page on the website.

The goal of this email is to keep recipients updated on the latest changes to a product and encourage them to visit the website. It can also seek to get recipients to decide on how to respond, whether that means clicking through to the website, filling out a fom, or making a purchase.

This is best used by businesses that sell physical products or software. An example of this would be an email from a clothing company announcing a new style of jeans.

  • Newsletter Subscription Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers when they sign up for a newsletter. It includes information about the newsletter and how often it will be sent.

The goal of this email is to keep recipients updated on the latest news and information from the business. As a side, a newsletter subscription subtly nudges recipients to read the newsletter and click on the links inside. It can work indirectly to get recipients to complete a desired action, whether that means clicking through to the website, signing up through a form, or making a purchase.

An example of this would be an email from a construction news website announcing the launch of their newsletter with a lead magnet such as exclusive access to an email list for contractors.

  • Event Invitation Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers when there is an upcoming event, such as a webinar, conference, or workshop. It includes information about the event and a link to register.

The goal of this email is to get recipients to sign up, RSVP, and attend the event. This is best used by businesses that are looking to generate leads or sales.

An example of this would be an email from a business consulting company inviting people to attend a webinar or live stream.

  • Dedicated Send Email

This type of email is sent to a specific group of subscribers, usually those who have been identified as high-value customers or prospects. It includes information about a new product or service, or an update on an existing one, and a link to the website.

The goal of this email is to generate leads or sales from the target audience. This is best used by businesses that are looking to increase revenue from their existing customer base or reach new customers. An example of this would be an email from a software company announcing a new enterprise product to its high-value customers.

This type of email can also be sent to subscribers when there’s a special event or promotion that requires its own email. As a marketing strategy, it can be similar to cold calling in some ways, as it is geared towards reaching a valued customer.

  • Internal Updates

This type of email is sent to employees or other internal stakeholders when there are updates on company policies, procedures, or initiatives. It includes information about the update and a link to the company intranet or website.

The goal of this email is to keep employees updated on the latest changes within the company. This is best used by businesses that have a large workforce or that are constantly making changes to their policies and procedures.

An example of this would be an email from a human resources department announcing a change in the company’s vacation policy.

This marketing email can also be sent to subscribers when there’s an update to the company that their customer base can benefit from by knowing, such as a new product launch or a change in leadership. When this is the objective, an organization can develop more brand awareness and build trust with their audience.

  • Co-Marketing Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers when two or more companies are working together on a marketing campaign. It includes information about the campaign and how recipients can get involved.

The goal of this email is to generate leads or sales from the target audience. This is best used by businesses that are looking to increase their reach and exposure by partnering with other companies.

An example of this would be an email from a software company and a hardware company announcing a joint promotion.

TRANSACTIONAL EMAILS

  • Confirmation Update Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers when they take an action, such as making a purchase or signing up for a service. It includes information about the transaction and a link to the website.

The goal of this email is to confirm the transaction and provide the customer with all the relevant information. This is best used by businesses that want to provide a good customer experience and build trust with their audience.

An example of this would be an email from an online retailer confirming an order and providing the delivery details.

  • Thank You (or Kickback) Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers after they take an action, such as making a purchase or signing up for a service. It includes a thank you message and a link to the website.

The goal of this email is to show appreciation to the customer and build goodwill. This is best used by businesses that want to provide a satisfying customer experience, further nurture the relationship, and cement trust with their audience.

An example of this would be an email from a retailer thanking the customer for their purchase and offering a discount on their next purchase.

  • Post-Purchase Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers after they make a purchase. It can include information about the product, how to use it, and a link to the website.

The goal of this email is to provide the customer with all the relevant information about the product and how to use it. This is best used by businesses that want to nurture the relationship and build trust with their audience through a satisfying experience where customers are taken care of.

An example of this would be an email from an online retailer providing the customer with information on how to use the product they just purchase, such as an instruction manual or step-by-step video. These post-purchase marketing emails can also include a link to surveys or reviews asking for client feedback or customer satisfaction.

  • Welcome Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers when they sign up for a service, make a purchase, or become a member of an organization. It includes information about the organization and how to get started.

The goal of this email is to welcome the subscriber and introduce them to the organization. This is best used by businesses that want to provide a good customer experience, build trust with their audience, and increase loyalty.

An example of this would be an email from a subscription service welcoming the customer and giving them a brief overview of how to use the service or how to learn more about the brand.

  • Lead Nurturing Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers who have shown an interest in a product or service, but have not yet made a purchase. It includes information about the product or service and how it can benefit the target buyer.

The goal of this email is to build a relationship with the subscriber and get them interested in the product or service. This is best used by businesses that want to increase sales and conversion rates.

An example of this would be an email from a clothing retailer to someone who has visited the website but not made a purchase, showcasing new arrivals or items on sale.

  • Reactivation Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers who have not engaged with the brand for a while. It includes information about the brand and how to get involved.

The goal of this email is to re-engage with the subscriber and increase loyalty. This is best used by businesses that want to maintain a relationship with their audience and keep them coming back.

An example of this would be an email from a social media platform to a user who has not logged in for a while, letting them know about new features or updates.

  • Abandoned Cart Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers who have added items to their cart but have not completed the purchase. It includes information about the product and a link to the website.

The goal of this email is to increase sales and conversion rates by reminding the subscriber about the product they were interested in. This is best used by businesses that want to increase their revenue.

An example of this would be an email from an online retailer to a customer who has added items to their cart but not completed the purchase, reminding them about the items in their cart and providing a link to the website.

  • Opt-In Email

This type of email is sent to subscribers who have not yet opted in to receive emails from the brand. It includes information about the benefits of opting in and a link to the website.

The goal of this email is to increase the number of subscribers who opt in to receive emails from the brand. This is best used by businesses that want to increase their email marketing list.

An example of this would be an email from a website asking the subscriber to opt in to receive updates and newsletters, promos, or ads from the site.

Now that you’re a bit more familiar with the different types of emails for an email marketing campaign, you’ll be better equipped to navigate your way through A/B testing in email marketing.

What is A/B Testing in Email Marketing?

In email marketing, A/B testing compares the performance of marketing emails to see which one performs better. The goal of A/B testing is to improve the performance of an email by making small changes and measuring the results.

There are a few different factors that can be tested in an A/B test, such as:

  • Subject line
  • Email content
  • From name
  • Send time
  • Day of the week
  • CTA (call-to-action)

To properly A/B test an email, businesses should start with one variable and change only that variable in the second version of the email. This will help to isolate the effects of the change and accurately measure the results.

To do this, businesses will send out one version of an email campaign to a group of subscribers, and then send out a different version of the email campaign to another group of subscribers. The results of the A/B test will be used to determine which campaign is more effective and should be used going forward.

It’s important to note that A/B testing should be an ongoing process, as there is always room for improvement. Email campaigns should be constantly tested and optimized to ensure that they are performing at their best. This is why an experienced email marketing agency can spend around three to six months or even a year in analyzing results and running email marketing tests.

Now that you understand what A/B testing is and how it works, let’s take a look at how it can be used in email marketing.

How to Do A/B Testing in Email Marketing?

There are a few different ways to do A/B testing in email marketing. The most common method is to split the list of subscribers into two groups, and then send one version of the email campaign to group A and another version of the email campaign to group B. The results of the A/B test will be used to determine which campaign is more effective and should be used going forward.

When it comes to A/B testing email marketing campaigns, there are a few different things that you can test. Here are some examples:

Subject Lines

The subject line is the first thing that recipients will see when they receive your email. This makes it one of the most important elements of your email. A/B testing can be used to test different subject lines to see which one is more effective at getting recipients to open the email.

Call to Action

The call to action is what you want recipients to do after they read your email. This could be clicking through to your website, making a purchase, or signing up for a free trial. A/B testing can be used to test different calls to action to see which one is more effective at getting recipients to take the desired action.

Email Content

Email content can be tested to see what type of content is more effective at getting recipients to engage with your email. For example, you could test different types of images or videos to see which ones get more clicks, or you could test different types of copy to see which one gets more people to click through to your website.

Sender Information

The sender information is the name and email address that recipients will see when they receive your email. A/B testing can be used to test different sender information to see which one is more effective at getting recipients to open the email.

Send Time

The send time is the time of day that your email is sent. A/B testing can be used to test different send times to see which one is more effective at getting recipients to open the email.

Frequency

The frequency is the number of emails that you send in a given period of time. A/B testing can be used to test different frequencies to see which one is more effective at getting recipients to engage with your email.

Another method of A/B testing is to send out the same email campaign to all subscribers, but include a variable for each group, such as using a different CTA. For example, one group of subscribers might be asked to click through to the website, while another group of subscribers might be asked to make a purchase. The results of the A/B test will be used to determine which call to action is more effective and should be used going forward.

Essentially, when there is a particular focus on the different elements of an email marketing campaign, testing different subject lines, different versions of the email content, or different CTA’s, among others, influences A/B testing methods.

The goal of an email marketing test such as CTA, subject line, or email content performance can be measured in terms of opens, clicks, or conversions. In testing these factors, the campaign that performs better is the one that should be used going forward, but data should still be tracked and measured, regardless of the business’ industry.

There are a number of different factors that you can test when it comes to email marketing campaigns. The key is to focus on the factors that are most important to your business and to your goals.

Conclusion: Why A/B Testing Email Marketing Campaigns is Important

A/B testing provides a valuable tool that can help provide insight and augment the effectiveness of your email marketing campaigns. It is through the tracking, measuring, and optimization of the performance of your campaign wherein you can determine what works best for your business and your goals.

To get the most out of A/B testing, it is important to focus on the factors that are most important to your business. By doing this, you can ensure that your email marketing campaigns are impactful enough to help your business or organization reach its goals.

If you want to learn more about email marketing strategies, feel free to visit our blogs or contact us today.

Leave a Comment